Photo Friday 13/52

Mr. McB and I haven’t had much time together lately. Thanks to a class cancellation, he was able to take off for a little road trip this weekend.

This photo was taken at Fort Frederica on Saint Simons Island. The fort was an important defense to keep colonial Georgia from falling into Spanish hands. It’s ruins and earthworks now.

We saw this dogwood tree wrapped in Spanish moss on our way out of the park. The blossoms seem to float in a sea of tangles, I love the effect.

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Photo Friday 9/52

While I was waiting for Mr. McB to come out of the baggage claim doors at GSP on Friday night, I took a photo that was supposed to be my Photo Friday. I didn’t get it posted on Friday night and Siri must have decided that the image was not ideal, because said photo is no longer in my camera roll.

Instead, I am sharing a photo taken during our adventures last Saturday. We decided to jump in the car and check out Abbeville and Greenwood, SC. It was a great day to just cruise around the back roads and enjoy time together. Between the two, I liked Abbeville more. It has the cutest little square. There will be a blog post in the future.

There was definitely an Emerald City vibe going on in this shot from Greenwood. I love this shade of green.

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Since the Photo Friday post was late, I should probably throw in a bonus. Here’s an image from our trip to Table Rock State Park. When the Lord blesses you with a warm day in early March, you get out an enjoy his creation. This delicate little flower is called a trout lily. It can take seven years for the plant to mature and this wee bloom to appear. I would say it is worth the wait.

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Photo Friday 7/52 & 8/52

I was derailed from my posts but for good reason. Last Photo Friday, I was hanging out with my sweet friends, Jen and Ash. I want to keep up with my posts but never at the expense of enjoying real life.

So tonight you’re getting a mega Photo Friday.

1604643_10151917447902233_916864272_nThis image from Valentine’s Day 2014, shows what happened when I tried to replace Mr. McB’s wiper blades. Those stubborn things just didn’t want to budge. With persistence, I managed to replace all three of his blades. Next year, I’ll just get a heart-shaped steak instead.

1604717_10151917671192233_1993584928_nThis week’s photo was taken on Sunday during our trip to Biltmore. It was a great day of exploring the grand estate with wonderful friends. It all makes a girl realize just how lucky she is.

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More Furman photos

This isn’t the first time I’ve shared photos from a trip to Furman. This really is one of the loveliest campuses that I have ever visited. I’m thankful that it is just a short drive away.

These photos were taken on various visits during the summer.

 

Soft purple grains dot these tufts of long green grasssoftpurple

 

“I have never found a companion that was so companionable as solitude.”
― Henry David Thoreau, Walden
This cabin is a replica of the one Thoreau lived in while writing Walden. Seeing this helps put his work into perspective. It also explains why he spent so much time in nature as staying inside this tiny cabin would drive me mad. Perhaps he paid so much attention to those ants to avoid going home.

replica of the walden cabin
Shi Center for Sustainabilityshi center for sustainability

Turtles fighting for bits of breadfood fight

The ducks are out for a swim before darkness falls.lake at furman

In the summer, the Japanese garden is a gorgeous, lush  green.pathbylake
Sun sets on the rose garden

furman rose garden

This former Buddhist temple became part of Furman’s campus in 2008.retreat

Good night…

sunset

 

 

Brookgreen Gardens

Mr. McB and I spent Christmas at Myrtle Beach. It was the first time I have ever visited the beach in the winter but I definitely plan to do so again.
Archer and Anna Hyatt Huntington statueDespite many visits to the Myrtle Beach area, this trip marked my first visit to Brookgreen Gardens in Murrells Inlet. The gardens occupy land that once made up several rice plantations. The land was purchased by Archer and Anna Hyatt Huntington in 1930. The southern location was good for Anna’s health and the makeup of the gardens was the perfect place to display her sculptures. As time went on the Huntington’s broadened their vision to include pieces from other artists and now the garden is the largest collection of American sculpture in the world and the largest outdoor sculpture collection in the U.S.

The pieces are varied just like the land that comprises the gardens. It’s clear that the Huntington’s put a great deal of thought into the best way to integrate the art into the landscape.

bg_aligatorI highly recommend seeing the gardens if you get the chance. The tickets are reasonable and are good for several days. If you are visiting the area in the heat of the summer, multiple visits may be your best choice for seeing everything. As it was, we walked for at least eight miles and still didn’t see every single piece.

See the photos below to get a taste of what you could see during a visit to Brookgreen.

bg_arrowThe wall divides the more manicured gardens from the natural area near the tidal river that runs through the gardens.

Black Panther statueBlack Panther

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children's garden at brookgreenThe children’s garden is full of whimsy and color.

naked woman sculpture

sculpture set amongst the treesA great example of how the sculptures fit into the landscape.

white bloomSome blooms even in December

treesCandles left from the Night of 1,000 Candles holiday display

Time and the Fates of ManTime and the Fates of Man

Don QuixoteDon Quixote – Anna Hyatt Huntington

bg_falloffranceFall of France – One of my favorites
This piece depicts France’s fate in WWII.

frog babyFrog Baby in the children’s garden

bg_inspirationPegasus

musesMuses

bg_pepperbg_redbirdCardinal bg_seahorseSeahorse (reminds me of Mooseal from the Wuzzles)

bg_songofmyselfSong of Myself – one of many quotes and verses in the gardens

bg_foxThis fox lives in the zoo that is on the property.

bg_cowSo do these cows.

It’s a great place and again, one that I highly recommend.

Wasted time, Amish and the Georgia Aquarium

Yes, it’s a blog post and no, it’s not Thursday. I know I need to get into a routine, especially because I have things to write about but it’s not always easy. When my husband is home, I want to spend time with him. When he’s away, I seem to find ways to fill my time whether it’s working on projects, reading, cleaning or watching TV.

Take yesterday…I planned to write a post and then I wound up watching an Amish: Out of Order marathon on NatGeo. Before you start rolling your eyes, this series isn’t the trashy. It’s an honest and often heartbreaking look at what Amish face when they decide to come to the English world. As I watched it, I couldn’t help but feel grateful for the family I was born into and the life I have. I can’t imagine that there’s anything I could do to make my parents reject me and yet these ex-Amish men and women are literally shunned by those who are supposed to life, guide, and care for them. By time the last episode aired and poor Cephas died in that horrible car accident, I knew I wasn’t going to write.

Tonight, there is no TV or reading until blog posts are written. So please journey back to early June with me as I write about our trip to the Georgia Aquarium.

I’ll share just a few thoughts and then some photos from the trip. First, admission to the aquarium is expensive but it’s worth it. The whale sharks are just amazing. If the aquarium was nothing more than four whale sharks, it would be worth the cost of admission, just watch a feeding and you’ll agree.

Second, food in the dining area is expensive and worth it only because you can’t bring in outside food and you’ll need some kind of fuel to keep you going through the aquarium because it is a lot more than just whale sharks. I suggest getting a few sides and sharing. The food isn’t that great so you’re just looking for something to keep you going.

Here’s a random list of do’s and don’ts…some of which McB and I learned the hard way.

  • Avoid the aquarium on Saturday if possible. Arrive early if you are going on Saturday. My guess is Sunday is pretty nuts too.
  • Buy your ticket in advance.
  • Be prepared for crowds and general rudeness.
  • Know how to turn the flash off on your camera. McB wrote a nice little post about becoming a zenmaster and shooting gorgeous pictures in a crowded aquarium.
  • Get a schedule and go to a feeding in the Ocean Voyager area.
  • Experience at least one touch tank but don’t terrorize the animals. Yes, kids are always bad about this but on our visit we saw some misbehaving adults as well.
  • Don’t expect the dolphin show to be educational. It’s high production value, singing and light-up costumes but it is not educational. I was disappointed in what I saw so if you need to cut something from your schedule, cut this.
  • Bring some hand sanitizer.
  • Be sure to see the Beluga whales. They’re really neat creatures and it’s great fun to see them blow bubble rings. (not my video, not the GA aquarium) We learned that they have to put some effort into blowing these rings and seem to just do it for fun.
On the conveyor belt

Looking up from the people mover in Ocean Voyager

Diver at the Georgia Aquarium

Scrub-a-dub-dub This diver has to clean a giant “tub.”

Diver and whale shark (right) in the Ocean Voyager tank

Shark  Unlike the whale sharks, he has large teeth.

Colorful fish

More from Ocean Voyager

Photowalk – University of South Carolina

I must admit, it’s been a crazy month since I’ve started my job. I’ve fallen behind on a few things, like keeping every baseboard in my house dust-free, trying every new thing on Pinterest and blogging. I am committed to managing my time a bit better and staying on top of this blog, even if it means letting a bit of dust accumulate on the baseboards.

The photos in this post were taken at the University of South Carolina on Good Friday. Enjoy!

University of South Carolinaveterans memorialThis is adjacent to the World War Memorial on campus. When the building was constructed in the 1930s, it was believed that there would never be another World War. The building now houses University Publications.

Brick walls and palmettos

The Memorial Fountain (aka three-dish fountain) in the Caroliniana Garden was sporting garnet and black when I visited. The fountain is a memorial to South Carolina’s patriots who served in the Revolutionary War.

horseshoeThis photo looks onto The Horseshoe, the oldest part of the campus dating back to 1805. The monument seen in the distance is in memory of Rev. Maxcy, the first president of the then South Carolina College. Yeah, it’s a lot different from The Horseshoe, I’m used to talking about.

pineappleThe pineapple has long been associated with hospitality so it’s fitting that this one greets visitors at the Memorial Rose Garden.

fountainLooking toward the Thomas Cooper Library

torch bearer

The “Torchbearer” was donated to the university in 1965 by sculptress Anna Hyatt Huntington.

The campus was really lovely. I enjoyed the big, shady trees and old buildings.